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Wellesley College News 



VOL. XXX. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., FEBRUARY 9, 1922 



No. u; 



GRADUATE COUNCIL 

HOLDS MEETINGS 



Sixty Members Convene at 
Wellesley 



The Graduate Council of Wellesley 
College held the tirst meeting of its 
twenty-second session at Wellesley last 
week-end. This organization, virtually 
the administrative link between the 
college and the Alumnae Association, 
is formed of chosen representatives 
from all the Wellesley Clubs and meets 
twice yearly in February and June. 
The chief business of the meeting on 
Saturday was a report and discussion 
of constitutional revision. Plans to 
change the council into an advisory 
and recommending committee of the 
Alumnae Association are in progress, 
but so far nothing definite has been 
decided. 

On Saturday night, the Wellesley 
Tradition Meeting was held, and on 
Sunday afternoon informal talks were 
given in Shakespeare by President 
Pendleton, Dean Waite, Dean Tufts, 
M'ss Alice Wood and Miss Frances 
Knapp. A final consideration of the 
constitution and new business were 
tin subjects of the Monday meeting. 
The officers of the Council are: 
President. .Helen Knowles Bonnell, '07 
Vice-President. . .Helen Foss Wood, '94 
Second Vice-President 

Stella Wrenn Parsley, '88 

Secretary of the Executive Committee 

Ethel Doak Camp, '04 

Treasurer Jeannette Keim, '09 

Alumnae General Secretary of the 

Council Laura M. Dwight, '06 



PROF. BAKER TO LECTURE FEB. 18 



Professor George P. Baker of Har- 
vard University will lecture in Billings 
Hall, on February 18, at eight o'clock. 
The lecture is to take the place of the 
informal event scheduled on the Barn 
social program. Professor Baker will 
talk on the subject of current drama. 
The exact title will be announced 
later. 



FORUM TO MEET FEBRUARY 14 



Mrs. Appel Will Speak 

The speaker for the meeting of the 
Forum Tuesday evening, February 14, 
will be Mrs. K. E. Appel of the Massa- 
chusetts Child Labor Commission. She 
will explain the proposed bill for rais- 
ing the compulsory minimum of edu- 
cation to include children under six- 
teen years of age. Following Mrs. Ap- 
pel's talk there will be a discussion 
of the measure. The meeting will be 
held in the Music Library, and will be 
open to the college. 



NEWSPAPERS WANT STUDENT 
CORRESPONDENTS AT COLLEGE 



Reporter and Assistants Needed 
on Press Board 



The Press Board, which is made up 
of student reporters for the outsidt 
press, offers opportunity for experience 
in newspaper work, with payment. The 
various Boston papers, the Associated 
Press, and several papers in other cit- 
ies, desire correspondents here, and 
pay space rates for copy used, and, 
most of them, for pictures. By the 
rules of the College, only authorized 
students may give out material to the 
press. Authorization may be obtained 
from Miss Manwaring, who has gen- 
eral oversight of the Press Board, 
which is managed, however, in the 
weekly newsgathering, by student 
chairmen. The different members co- 
operate in the collection of news items, 
to save time, but each handles the 
news as the needs of her paper re- 
quire. Any reporter may send in ad- 
ditional stories, special articles, etc. 

While there is at present only one 
actual vacancy on the Press Board, 
there is opportunity for a number of 
assistant reporters, who would like to 
get some training for regular jobs next 
year. Most of the present reporters 
are seniors, and their places will there- 
fore be open for the best qualified ap- 
plicants at the end of this year. Ap- 
plication should be made to Miss E. 
W. Manwaring. 

Anyone who knows of a paper out- 
side, which would use the services of 
a correspondent, is asked to notify 
Miss Manwaring, who is eager to learn 
of possible openings of this sort. 



HISTORY DEPARTMENT TO HAVE NEW 
MEMBER 



A new member of the History De- 
partment, Mr. Phillips Bradley, has 
been announced to take the place of 
Miss Wambaugh next semester. Be- 
sides the course in Constitutional Gov- 
ernment, History 206, he will also give 
a course in Political Theories. Mr. 
Bradley has been teaching at Vassar. 
His work for his doctor's degree at 
Harvard was interrupted by the war, 
in which he served in the Navy. 



ENGLISH LITERATURE 302 



On February 14, Miss Bates' course 
in contemporary English poetry will 
meet as usual at 3:40. Her reading 
takes place, if there is an audience, 
the following hour, in room 124. This 
statement is to clear away a slight 
misunderstanding arising from last 
week's announcement, and to deprive 
the members of course 302 of their 
happy expectation of a cut. 

Katherine Lee Bates. 



PRESIDENT PENDLETON 

VISITS MIDDLE WEST 



Addresses Meetings of Wellesley 
Clubs 



President Pendleton has returned to 
Wellesley after a tour of several weeks 
through the Middle West, where she 
visited Wellesley Clubs and prepara- 
tory schools in Buffalo, Chicago, Min- 
neapolis, Sioux Falls, Omaha, and De- 
troit. She took this occasion to ex- 
press to the Wellesley Clubs the 
gratitude of the college to the 
alumnae and friends who helped 
in raising the June Quota of the Semi- 
centennial Fund last Commencement. 
In each city President Pendleton was 
received with ovations and was enter- 
tained at luncheons, dinners, and tea. 

In Chicago she represented Welles- 
ley in the annual meeting of the Asso- 
ciation of American Colleges. During 
her stay there a luncheon was given 
in her honor, attended by one hundred 
and sixty Wellesley graduates and 
their guests who represented prepara- 
tory schools. 

At Sioux Falls, S. D., and Omaha, 
she spoke to various preparatory 
schools and Parent-Teachers Associa- 
tions. In these talks she pointed out 
the need of cooperation between the 
colleges and preparatory schools 

At a dinner given in Detroit, Janu- 
ary 24, for the benefit of seven wo- 
men's colleges in the Orient, Miss Pen- 
dleton was one of the main speakers 
to the thousand women who were 
present. Because of her trip to the 
Far East in 1920, she was able to give 
a vivid account of the work, the pro- 
posed enlargements, and the educa- 
tional advantages, which means so 
much to the Asiatic women. Miss 
Pendleton's speech was marked by the 
same earnestness which caused the 
Rockefeller board to vote for the large 
Laura Spellman Rockefeller gift to the 
Union Colleges and Medical Schools of 
the Orient, after hearing her report. 
She returned to Wellesley on January 
27. 



ACADEMIC FUROR FILLS COLLEGE 



Busy Signs Prevail 



Among the traditions of Wellesley, 
lives one that never even threatens to 
die, mid-year examinations. The first 
part of every February sees the same 
scenes revived, and this year has been 
no exception. There is, indeed, no ex- 
ception necessary to prove this rule: 
the proof was made long ago. Corri- 
dors bristling with busy signs, and 
distraught individuals sitting behind 
them, poring over the accumulated 
notes of months, are always the first 
unmistakable signs of approaching 
exams. Frequent disputes are mainly 

(Continued on Page 5, Column 3) 



STORIES AND TRADITIONS 
RELIEVE STRAIN OF WEEK 



Barn Audience Hears Faculty 
Reminiscences 



A tradition meeting, the first since 
1916, held Saturday evening, February 
4, in the Barn, brought together a 
large and enthusiastic audience, who 
demonstrated with applause the esprit 
de corps which was roused in them by 
faculty tales of the long-ago Wellesley. 

President Pendleton was the first of 
the speakers. Her subject, Early Tradi- 
tions of the College, was developed 
with a variety of description of an in- 
formal nature. Float Night was, in 
days of yore, an occasion for which 
one wore a specific costume: a flannel 
jacket with red, scallop-shaped hats 
perched aloft. It was the hospitable 
practice of the crew at this time to 
take the college guests out in the boats. 
On Tree Day, the costume worn by those 
who were seniors in Miss Pendleton's 
freshman year, consisted of a black silk 
dress, a black parasol, and a red ger- 
anium in the belt. This ensemble was 
alleged to represent Beauty. The 
sophomores were expected to supply 
humor, and freshmen, youth and inno- 
cence. 

At that time all four classes had 
Bible twice weekly, and it was custom- 
ary for all Bible appointments to be 
cancelled if a visiting speaker could 
address the college at that hour. If 
this was impossible, then a novel 
method of shortening each morning 
(Continued on Page 3, Col. 1) 



GRADUATES FIND JOBS ELUSIVE 



Hold Out Hope for Advancement 



The most recent development of the 
much-discussed issue "Can College 
Girls Find Jobs?" appears in a letter 
from that member of 1921 who is the 
original of Miss Sturgess' depressing 
picture. The latter's article describ- 
ing the situation of the college gradu- 
ate as wage-earner aroused, along with 
considerable gloom among undergrad- 
uates, a vigorous refutation by Miss 
Wood. The following letter is inter- 
esting in that while it confirms the 
pessimistic view of conditions taken 
by Miss Sturgess it yet holds out the 
hope of rapid advancement to pros- 
pective workers. 

Parnassus Club, 
605 W. 115th St., 
New York City. 
Editor of The Wellesley News, 
Wellesley College, 
Wellesley, Mass. 
Dear Editor: 

I read with great interest the article 
in the NEWS called "College Girls Can- 
not Find Jobs," and Miss Woods' reply. 

(Continued on Page 5, Col. 2.) 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



HAVE YOU SEEN 

Our Attractive Waists, Suits, 
Sweaters and Dresses 

PECK BROOKS CO., Inc. 



WABAN ANNEX 



We lies ley Inn 



has 

STEAKS, FRIED CHICKEN 

and WAFFLES 

for those who enjoy good food and pleasant 
surrounding:*. 

Telephone 1R0. Reserve the Chimney Cor- 
ner for yoitr Dinner Par ty. 



DR. L. B. ALLYN 

of the Westfield Laboratories gives 

OAN-HYJA 

Ginger Ale 

a high place among carbonated beverages. 
We say, it's delectable. 

Buy it at Wellesley stores and tea- 
rooms and we'll "Do it well for Wellesley '. 

HYGEIA BEVERAGES, Inc. 



NATICK 



MASS. 



P. S. — You'll find our bottled orangeade 
(Hello) equal to fresh orange juice. It's 
the drink for after exercise. 



COLLEGE NOTES 



Venus 



THIN 

lead: 

Jf°38 




For 



'VENUS EVERPOINTED 

and ether Metal Pencils 



THE name VENUS is your 
guarantee of perfection. 
Absolutely crumble- proof, 
smooth and perfectly graded. 
7 DEGREES" 

2B soft Bi black H tried, hard 
B soft 2H hard 

F f m 4H extra hard 

I"iB medium — for general use 

15c f-r tube of 12 letdt; 

$1.j0 per dozen tubes 

If your dc-alercannot supply you writeus. 

American Lead Pencil Co. 

215 Fifth Ave., Dept. , New York 
Ask us about the ncty 
VENUS EVERPOINTED PENCILS 



Maude Ludington, '21, and Laura 
Johnson, '21, spent the week-end in 
Wellesley. 

The subject for Intercollegiate De- 
bate has been announced as "Re- 
solved, that the United States should 
grant independence to the Philip- 
pines." 

After-Comp teas were held for the 
Freshmen at Tower Court, Shafer, 
Freeman and Fiske, Friday, February 
3. 

Mrs. .Willard Travell, of New York 
City, spent last week-end with her 
daughter at Norumbega. 

Adelaide Kohn, '22, attended the 
wedding of Jan^t Victorious, '21, in 
New York, Thursday, February 2. 

Miss Helen French, of the Chemis- 
try Department, spent the week-end 
at her home in Lexington, Mass. 

Frances Baum, '22, is at her home 
in New York, recuperating from a 
minor operation. 

Chapel exercises Tuesday, January 
31, were led informally by Miss Bragg. 

Marian Hulbert, '24, has returned to 
college, after being quarantined for 
six weeks with scarlet fever. 

Mi s Gertrude Williams, of the 
Chemistry Department, has been 
spending a week in New York. 



ENGAGED 



'22 Elizabeth C. Morrison to Dr. 
Herman A. Osgood, Harvard, '11, of 
Boston, Mass. 



Eyes Examined 

Lenses Ground and all 
kinds of OPTICAL 
REPAIRING done. 

A. B. HAYDEN, 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Wellesley Square 



The Green Bough Tea 

Specia Uy Sh op 



597 Washington Street, 



Wellesley, Mass. 



Afternoon Tea 
2 to 5 P.M. 



MISS C. I. J ELFE 



Sunday Dinner 
1 to 2 



Dinner 
6 to 7 P. M. 



MISS C. ROUSSEL 



-»■-— 1* *» — 



NO (SPRING YET, SAYS GROUND 
HOG 



Let the Outing Club take heart and 
prepare for the carnival with all the 
confidence of fulfillment, and woe 
unto those who frequent the spring 
fashion shows, for lo, the prophet 
hath spoken! His honor, the Ground 
Hog, having peeked out cautiously 
from his winter quarters on February 
2, beheld his shadow, declared six 
weeks more of winter weather, and 
retired. 



STUDENT GIVES ART TREASURE 
TO FARNSWORTH MUSEUM 



Elizabeth Drake, "22, Presents Rare 
Copy of Vienna "Genesis" 



From Elizabeth Drake, '22, the Art 
Department has received the valuable 
gift of a photographic reproduction, 
in 52 plates, of the famous Vienna 
Genesis, one of the earliest and most 
interesting Christian manuscripts, 
with miniatures. The copies of this 
famous manuscript in the Vienna 
Rofmuseum have been difficult to ob- 
tain. It was only by indefatigable 

effort and persuasion that Miss Drake 
succeeded in inducing the museum au- 
thorities to sell one of their five re- 
maining copies. Thanks to her in- 
sistence on the claims of the students 
at Wellesley, who ought to have the 
opportunity of studying these plates, 
the Art Department is enriched by 
this important contribution to its 
study of mediaeval art. 

The plates are on exhibition in the 
Art Gallery through February 18. 
They are interesting to others than 
art students, for the quaintness and 
naivete of such scenes as that of 
Joseph parting from his small brother 
Benjamin. The accompanying ex- 
planatory text, with two fine plates 
in color, may also be seen on applica- 
tion to the Museum office. 



WILSON FUND TOTALS $300,0110 



College Gifts Range From Pennies to 
Dollars 



Up to date, February 1, the Wel- 
lesley College contribution to the Wil- 
son Foundation totals $140, given by 
forty members of the faculty, e'ght 
seniors, eleven juniors, eleven sopho- 
mores, twelve freshmen, two unclassi- 
fied students and eight friends who 
chose to give through the college. 
This sum has come to the various 
members of the committee in amounts 
running from twenty-five cents to one 
star contribution of twenty-five dol- 
lars, a student's gift. The house that 
leads in the number of contributors 
and, except for that phenomenal 
check, in the amount contributed, is 
Fiske. It has been especially pleas- 
ant to receive contributions from far- 
away but ever loyal old friends, as 
Professor Whiting and her sister, in 
the South for the winter, but eager 
to have their gifts counted in with 
Wellesley's. 

The quota for the State of Massa- 
chusetts is $85,000; for Middlesex 
county, $5,400; for the town of Welles- 
ley, $374. Wellesley was one of the 
first six towns in the State to fill the 
quota, which is now considerably over- 
subscribed, Dana Hall, which has 
raised $150, and the College, a little 
behind its younger sister, counting In 
as parts of the town. It will not be 
long before the entire million is 
raised. At present, with only partial 
reports from only twenty-five states 
turned in, the fund exceeds $300,000; 
but the opportunity to become a found- 
er of the Woodrow Wilson Awards, 
destined to play so large a part in 
stimulating the higher political life of 
America, is still open. Contributions 
may be sent to Miss Mary Caswell, 
Miss Erma V. R,ell, Miss Leah Rab- 
bitt or the undersigned. 

Katharine Lee Bates, 

Chairman. 



VISIT THE HAT SHOP 

Room 21 " THE WABAN " 

up one flight 

SPECIAL HATS 

Tarns, Sport Hats and Dress Hats 

at Moderate Prices 



Girdles and Brassieres 

Bloomers, Chemises, Pajama Suits 

and Night-Gowns 

New and Beautiful Hosiery 

Ostrich Feather Fans 

Flower Trimmings and 

Gift Novelties 

Madame Whitney's 

Up one flight The Waban Bldg. 



Baggage Transferred To and From Station 

Orders Promptly Attended To 

Telephone 16 

DIEHL'S GARAGE & TAXI SERVICE 

R. DIEHL, Proprietor 

37 CENTRAL STREET, - WELLESLEY, MASS. 

Limousines and Touring Cars To Let By Hour, Day or Trip 
Meet All Trains 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



STOKIES AM) TRADITIONS 

RELIEYE STRAIN OF WEEK 



(Continued From Page One) 



class five minutes gave a surplus by 
noontime, in which the speaker was 
hoard. This was called "throwing the 
day forward." 

There was in those days, said Miss 
Pendleton, no commutation ticket or 
tea room to detract from the unity of 
college life. 

Music Traditions 

l'rofesS:>r 11. (.'. Macdougall related 
stfme of his~^5fperiences as a music 
preceptor and guide, many of which re- 
vealed feminine foibles which have not 
yet become mere tradition. The fact 
of being gowned, he observed, had 
given the choir added attractions. Glee 
Clubs of yore and their concerts were 
described as "an extremely decorous 
performance," which began at 7:30. 
"And as usual, the Glee Club arrived 
promptly at 8:30." 

Here a Wellesley Glee Club of yester- 
year appeared on the stage, dressed in 
the white bell skirts and long flounces 
peculiar to the era. They sang old 
songs, among them one written by 
Professor Bates, called "Snowdrifts," 
and another an academic adaptation 
of "I've been working on the railroad." 
The applause provoked by this num- 
ber assured the performers that "I've 
been working on the records" was un- 
derstood to its fullest by the audience. 

Miss Emma MacAlarney's address, 
while recalling the history of college 
publications, was more concerned with 



its plea for more of the older songs to 
be printed in the Wellesley Song Book. 
"All Hail the College Beautiful" she 
gave as an example of a song left out 
that should have been included. 
Miss Gamble Gives Academic Story 

Professor Eleanor Gamble, half of 
whose life has been spent as teacher 
and student at Wellesley, relatsd many 
circumstances connected with the 
founding and early history of the col- 
lege, which illustrated the spirit that 
ruled Wellesley academic life at that 
time. After touching upon Mr. and 
Mrs. Durant, Miss Gamble spoke in a 
serious vein of the conviction they had 
had in her student days that learning 
was good in itself. They had not de- 
manded that it serve a practical pur- 
pose as well. Wellesley, she reminded 
her audience, had had the distinction 
of being the first woman's college — in- 
deed, almost the first of any kind of 
college — to have a Psychology labora- 
tory. Her own class, she affirmed, the 
class of '89, had been a dividing line in 
the history of the college. It was the 
first class to have a weekly paper, a 
Legenda, and Tree Day dancing. They 
had also witnessed the revival of Zeta 
Alpha and Phi Sigma societies, and 
the first outside play. 

With Miss Hazard's inauguration 
came the real beginning of modern 
Wellesley, in 1899. The academic in- 
terest was paramount in the days be- 
fore trolley cars and automobiles came 
to Wellesley. The faculty enforced 
quiet hours, and the students, as Miss 
Gamble remarked, were "a meek set 




of people." There was little social 
life, and intellectual tastes were com- 
paratively much alike. The founding 
of the Barn was described by Miss 
Gamble as being the result of efforts 
of Mary Haskell, who secured its reno- 
vation and flooring by her active work, 
and who afterwards became its first 
president. 

The Tradition meeting was planned, 
and financed by, the Alumnae Associa- 
tion. The program for the evening 
follows: 
Early Traditions 

Ellen P. Pendleton, '86 
Musical Traditions. . .Prof. Macdougall 

Illustrating Glee Club 
Wellesley Publications 

Emma L. MacAlarney, '92 
Academic Traditions 

Eleanor A. Mc. C. Gamble, '89 

Spirit of Play Mary -Haskell '97 

Wellesley Film 



APPOINTMENT BUREAU 

Details regarding positions men- 
tioned in this column will be fur- 
nished by the Director of the Appoint- 
ment Bureau in response to inquiry 
by letter, or in office hours, 5 Admin- 
istration Building. The prefixed num- 
ber should always be mentioned. 

105 AN — For the coming summer 
there are several vacancies in a State 
normal college in Louisiana for can- 
didates who have had experience as 
teachers and who have the M. A. de- 
gree. 

110 AA — Club work and community 
organization in connection with teach- 
ing is required at a community centre 
in the Kentucky mountains. A small 
but adequate salary is offered and the 
living conditions are comfortable. 

111 AW — The Bureau is in receipt 
of a request from an eastern college 
for women for a custodian in a de- 
partment of Biology, the position to 
include secretarial work as well as 
% neral oversight of the supplies of 
the department. A candidate who de- 
sires permanent work of this sort is 
desired rather than ons who regards 
it as a temporary step to advanced 
work. 



:• 
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Ice Cream 
Fancy Cakes 
Catering 



DR. STANLEY E. HALL 

DENTIST 

The WABAN Wellesley, Mass. 

Telephone 566-W 



A. CAN 



FASHIONABLE LADIES' TAILOR 
BIDING HABITS A SPECIALTY 

Cleansing — Pressing — Altering 

ALL KINDS OF FURS REMODELLED 

548 WASHINGTON ST., Wellesley, Mass. 

Next to the Post Office. Tel. Wellesley 471- W 



Your Corsage 
For the Prom 




THE FLORIST 



It is as important as your 
costume. Fragrant, dainty, 
pretty flowers will lend a 
charm that is distinctive in 
its simplicity. 

Orchids, sweet Peas, 
Violets, Lily-of-the- Valley, 
and Roses make combin- 
ations that harmonize with 
any color. 

Simply Phone 

Wellesley 597 



Why don H you give j 
your order by 
Phone? 138W \ 




WE WILL DELIVER 
THE SAME FREE 
ANY TIME. 



A Full Line of Fruit, 
| Candies, Groceries and 
I Vegetables. 

\ WELLESLEYl 

( FRUIT CO, ! 

i 



,_i 



Teachers Wanted 

1 an rural — five high school— con- 
tracts waiting. 

NATIONAL TEACHERS AGENCY 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Wellesley Tea and Food Shop 

Hours 11.30 A.M. to 7 P.M. 

Alice G. Coombs, '83 
Grace I. Coombs, '94 

Wellesley Square 
Over Post Office. Tel. 



"'+ 



TAXI SERVICE 
Baggage Transfer 



Perkins Oarage 

SUMNER FROST, Proprietor 



69 Central St., Wellesley, Mass. 

Telephone 
Wellesley 409 

CARS STORED. Let us store your 
car for you in our new modern 
Garage. Cars washed and polished. 



^ 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



EDITOR IN CHIEF 

ELIZABETH M. WOODY. 1922 
Associate Editors 

BEATRICE JEFFERSON. 1922 
DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS, 1922 
Assistant Editors 
DOROTHEA COMLY. 1922 

MARGARET WATTERSON. 1922 
ELIZABETH ALLEN, 1923 

ELIZABETH SANFORD, 1923 

HELEN STAHL. 1923 

LOUISE CHILD. 1924 

BARBARA CONGER, 192* 
RUTH HELLER, 1924 
MARY FRASER, 1923 

DOROTHY MERZ, 1923 

CHARLOTTE MORRIS, 1925 

EVELYN ROAT. 1925 
ELIZABETH BUETHE, 1924 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 

SUSAN GRAFFAM. 1922 

Circulation Manager 

BARBARA BATES, 1922 

Assistant Circulation Manager 

MARGARET INGRAHAM, 1923 

Advertising Manager 

RUTH WHITE, 1923 

Assistant Managers 

MAY FALES, 1924 
ANNETTE WRIGHT, 1924 



Published weekly during the college year by a board of students of Wellesley Col- 
lege. Subscriptions, one dollar and seventy-five cents per annum in advance. Single 
copies, six cents each. All contributions should be in the News office by 9.00 P. M. on 
Sunday at the latest and should be addressed to Elizabeth Woody. All Alumnae news 
should be sent to Laura Dwight. Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. All business 
communications and subscriptions should be sent to the Wellesley College News. 
Wellesley, Mass. 

Entered as second-class matter, October 10, 1919, at the Post Office at Wellesley 
Branch, Boston, Mass., under the Act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at 
special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized 
October 30, 1919. 



THANKS ARE DUE T0- 



The members of the ,NEWS Board 
are divided. One faction fancies call- 
ing ourselves martyrs, while the op- 
position stands out for the title of 
missionaries, or at least earnest so- 
cial workers. For, contrary to prece- 
dent, we have printed an issue during 
mid-years! 

Doubtless, the tragic import of the 
fact cannot be appreciated by the un- 
initiated. But, with tears in our eyes, 
we beg any scoffer just to try to write 
a sprightly account of the college 
girl's happy round of pleasure when 
she is faced by several hundred un- 
dergraduates, hollow-eyed with anx- 
iety, who are thinking, working, living 
to one end — mid-years. 

We share the feeling of triumph 
that is Thursten's, and the Great 
Keller's when they pluck a flowering 
rose bush from thin air. From a 
newsless void we have evoked an 
vUght-page issue. And if our creation 
seems a trifle airy, too — what would 
you? 

So read with a lenient eye, we beg. 
And remember that we write at the 
darkest hour of the Reign of Terror. 



A WORD TO ADD 



One would not think too highly of a 
paper-hanger who in a moment of re- 
vulsion against his trusty step-ladder, 
kicked it out from under him. Lad- 
ders may be utilitarian things, but 
garland pasting would suffer a set- 
back if the ladders decided to fold up 
resignedly and end it all. And after 
all is said and done, a great deal of 
ingenuity goes into the designing of 
a ladder that can accomplish its work 
sal isfactorily. 

And the lesson is this: Those who 
think of the advertisements in the 
NEWS as necessary evils, as space fill- 
ers thai crowd out other reading mat- 
ter and offer no valuable suggestions 
in themselves, reckon without the 
(acts. Without the advertising, the 
paper could be at best only two or 
lour page; long, and even then the 
subscription price would almost sure- 
ly rise. Aside from their financial life- 
saving role, advertisements are really 



interesting and profitable reading 
matter. Interesting because a great 
deal of care and forethought goes 
into the writing of them, and profit- 
able because they furnish an infor- 
mation bureau where students who 
know little or nothing about where 
things can best be bought can learn 
what concerns are most anxious to 
eater to the student trade. 

So give the "ad" its due, and re- 
member that it, after all, is the real 
staff upon which a college newspaper 
has to lean. 



Free Press Column 



All contributions for this column must be 
signed with the full name of the author. 
Only articles thus signed will be printed. 
Initials or numerals will be used in printing 
the articles if the writer so desires. 

The Editors do not hold themselves re- 
sponsible for opinions and statements which 
appear in this column. 

Contributions should be in the hands of 
the Editors by 9 P. M. on Sunday. 

Contributions must be as brief as possible. 



A SACRIFICE FOR NO GAIN 



To the Wellesley College News: 

Since the Barn Plan is to be recon- 
sidered in April, members of the col- 
lege should understand every attitude 
which may be assumed toward it. One 
point of view is that of the society 
member who holds dear the history 
of societies in Wellesley and feels 
that their contributions to the college 
in the past merit some consideration 
now. 

There was a time when society 
plays were the supreme dramatic 
events in college. They were pro- 
duced, three a year, by a group work- 
ing with great concentration and 
earnestness, and many of them have 
gone into the annals of the college 
as a most valued part of its artistic 
achievement. In 1920, the societies 
willingly gave up their preeminence, 
not because the value of the work was 
any less, but because they were con- 
vinced that an all-college dramatic 
organization was more in keeping 
with the democratic ideals of Wellesley. 

That the societies are antagonistic 
to the principle of the Barn now, or 



that they wish to compete with it in 
any way is absurd. Society members 
are first of all members of Wellesley, 
and as such stand for everything that 
shall further the interests of the col- 
lege above any feeling for a smaller 
group. But when the college has so 
little to gain or even loses something 
by too severe suppression of the 
smaller group, which has done good 
service in its time, is there any need 
for the sacrifice? 

The Barn wishes to limit a society 
semi-open event to two hundred 
guests, for which no tickets may be 
sold. There may be two performances 
if but one hundred guests attend each. 
The societies ask simply that the 
number of guests be extended to five 
or six hundred, and that within that 
number as many as three hundred 
tickets may be sold. This does not 
yet raise the society's major event to 
the importance of a Barn "Pliscoda," 
where the attendance is limited only 
by the capacity of the Barn. Yet the 
society members spend their time and 
energy upon their semi-open meetings, 
limited as they are now, because they 
will not lower the standard, which 
their tradition has set them, no mat- 
ter what the difficulties, and the prod- 
uct of this effort may be appreciated 
by only two hundred people, of whom 
a large percentage are necessarily 
outsiders. 

It seems ridiculous to argue that 
this increase in the size of the audi- 
ence would divert the dramatic talent 
from the Barn to the societies. A girl 
who would choose her society play at 
five hundred guests, would do so at 
two hundred. But surely the societies 
have been generous in giving their 
best talent to the Barn. The girls 
who take part in the society plays, 
even the leads, are most often girls 
whom the Barn finds insufficient for 
its needs. 

If the Barn approves the society 
requests, it not only assures to itself 
the loyal support and eager coopera- 
tion of the societies, but gives the col- 
lege a larger opportunity to enjoy 
good dramatic work. It is difficult to 
see just what the college loses. 

1922. 



WHEN CHAPEL AND CLASSES 
CLASH 



To the Wellesley College News: 

There is a decided lack of co- 
ordination between the aims and prin- 
ciples of the Bible Department and 
the chapel services at Wellesley. It 
is most confusing for a student to 
hear the prophecy of Isaiah: 

"Behold the virgin shall be with 
child, and shall bring forth a son, 

And shall call his name Emanuel. 
(Is. 7, VII. 14), 

read at Christmas vespers as an au- 
thoritative prophecy of Jesus' birth, 
when she has just been told that it 
represents an isolated strand having 
nothing whatsoever to do with the 
New Testament. 

The simplest services of the chapel 
are filled with material, to which no 
one who has gained anything at all 
from her study of the Old and New 
Testament can subscribe. Is religion 
then to be an entirely separate and 

(Continued on Page 6, Column 3) 









' "^^ | T H 1_/~ 


'OuCOUTI 








l 


ADONAISik 


U^EBARrO 





ANENT EXAMS. 



Remarkable Remarks From Our 
Prominent Citizens 



MARION DOOLITTLE: "I consider 
the exams this year rather trying." 

KITTY GALOSH: "Mine were 
hard." 

ESTHER PESTER: "Quiet hour 
must and shall be enforced. I have 
bought a compressed-air shusher, and 
have found it very satisfactory. It 
works with a small electric motor." 

HORTENSE PICKLE: "In view of 
prevailing depression in the banana 
market, I believe that now is the time 
for more banana salad in our dining 
rooms." 

ARDELIA PNOOF: "Exams? Oh, 
yes, — exams. Well . . . all I can say 
is, heaven have mercy on us, for no 
one else will." 

EMMA VON GABBLE: "I simply 
asked her for some ink, you under- 
stand, and didn't she think the exam 
was hard, and was this black ink, and 
did she think she would go to New 
York after hers were over. And do 
you know, she said, 'For pity's sake 
shut up." I just don't understand 
rudeness; I don't understand it a 
tall." 

RUTH BUGG: "I have found it a 
great help in preparing for any exams 
to go to the library and read books on 
the subject. Sometimes I take notes 
on a sheet of any kind of paper 
handy." 

DULEY VARDON: "Even exams 
have their silver lining. On looking 
at our Math questions I felt my hair 
curling up into quite close ringlets. I 
have dispensed with my weekly mar- 
cel, therefore." 



FOR ART'S SAKE 



I took the car for Cambridge, 
On art museum bent. 
My pockets full of scribbled notes, 
On A's I was intent. 

"Fogg! Fogg!" I muttered to myself 
(Fogg's the museum's name). 
I bounded from the .subway car 
And up for air I came. 

Oh, how describe the novel sight 
That caught my shining eye — 
'Twas simply this — the Harvard 

youths 
Galoshly ambled by. 

Ten thousand saw I at a glance, 
Or so it seemed to me, 
I strode up to the Harvard cop 
"The mew-zee-um?" sezee. 

"Just take the street that's on your 

left 
And walk a block or so." 
I walked until I saw the place, 
"Ah, that is it, I know!" 

(Continued on Page 5, Col. 1) 



THE wellesley college news 



A DON A IS KEli.VKkS 



(Continued Prom Page 4, Col. 3) 



FOI{ AIM'S SAKE 



Before the door 1 recognized 

My friend of Art 13, 

"The discus thrower," I remarked; 

1 way a critic keen. 

Then up the steps 1 boldly strode. 
A passing youth looked strange, 
"A novel sight," my inward thought. 
"A girl's a welcome change." 

The door swung wide, I went inside — 
Oh horror piled on fear! 
Gymnasium the building was — 
Let's draw the curtain here * * * 

When consciousness returned once 

more, 
I sought the subway's depths. 
I threw a coin at the box 
And stumbled down the steps. 

And ne'er again while she has life 
To Cambridge this girl goes. 
And though I miss an A in Art, 
I've earned it, heaven knows! 



where, on land and sea, upon the 
sanctity of whose home-life the author 
has been many times permitted to in- 
trude, this treatise is cordially and 
reverently dedicated." 



(For a Math booklet) 
"To My Father, who flunked Math 
when he was in college, 1 lovingly as- 
cribe this fiasco." 



(HiADI'VTKS KIND JOBS KLI'SIVK 



(Continued From Page 1, Col. 3) 



DEDICATIONS AVE HAVE NEVER 

SEEN 



Suitable for the Front Pa^re of 
Examination Books 



(For English History) 
"To Henry VIII, without whose un- 
tiring zeal for matrimony the sixteenth 
century would have been rather dull." 



(For an Art 203 Booklet) 
"To the memory of the custodian at 
the Boston Museum, whose keen in- 
sight and sympathetic observation 
enabled me to recover my pocketbook 
and galoshes, this volume is affec- 
tionately dedicated." 



(To be inscribed in a Zoo book) 
"To all amoeba and protozoa every- 



The article, "College Girls Eat Humble 
Pie," in the New York Times which 
you quoted, was written by Marion 
Van B. Sturgess, a graduate of Welles- 
ley in 1917. The person whom she 
describes as a Wellesley graduate "an- 
swering telephone bells and doing 
files" is none other than yours truly. 

I wish to defend this piece of "bla- 
tant journalism" as it is based not on 
"possible" but on actual truth. It may 
be discouraging to members of 1922 
planning to enter the business world 
next year, but college girls inexperi- 
enced in business methods, With condi- 
tions as they are at present, are not in 
demand. 

Miss Sturgess' article is based on 
the experience of several members of 
1921 and 1920, girls who, fresh from 
college or teaching, come to ,New York 
to obtain business positions. These 
girls are clerking in Lord and Taylor's 
and Wanamaker's, reading proof for 
publishing houses, filing for charitable 
organizations, and doing clerical work 
for large concerns such as insurance, 
telephone, and electric companies, at 
salaries which seem pitifully inade- 
quate for a college-trained girl. 

Business men are overwhelmed by 
personal applications so that they have 
no need to search for employees. A 
college girl without special business 
training is a "drug on the market" un- 
less she is content to begin at the 
very bottom as other less well educated 
girls are doing. This is the reason 
(Continued on Page Seven) 




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Tweed "Knickers" <8.75 to $11.75 
Riding Habits $ 39.75 to $ 45.00 
Riding Breeches $ 5.95 to $ 16.00 



ACADEMIC FUKOR 

COLLEGE 



FILLS 



(Continued from Page 1) 



in terms of. "I don't know anything." 
and "Why, you know very well that 
you know twice as much as I do!" 

In the village, the examination agita- 
tion among the freshmen has been as 
pronounced as ever. Even though they 
occasionally forsake duty long enough 
to grease a few door-knobs, on the 
whole they realize that a sober and 
serious attitude is the fitting one. The 
statistics of last year's freshmen 
should reassure them: not one was 
flunked out of the class of 1924 at mid- 
years. 

The consolation in sight is that 
exams always end, and then comes 
the rite of throwing away notes, all 
kinds of notes, and enough to make a 
considerable bonfire. In the meantime, 
the best method of forgetting worries 
temporarily is to listen to the music 
Professor Macdougall plays daily, after 
chapel service. 



CORSETS 

•A Model ior Every Figure" 

Exclusive Models 
for the College 
Girl. 

See Our 

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Corset $3.95 

All fittings under Personal 
Supervision of Miss Adrian 
Bandeaux and Brassieres 
A Full and Complete Line of 
Hosiery. 





Corsets 
34 WEST ST., BOSTON, MASS. 




SUE RICE STUDIO 



PHOTOGRAPHS AND GIFTS 

VALENTINES 

COME IN AND LOOK 'EM OVER 

"If you are good at darning socks 

And cooking tasty food, 
And trimming hats and making frocks 

And have a cheerful mood, 
And if you're truly longing to 

Be someone's little pet, 
I want to whisper this to })ou 

'Some guy will get you y'et' " 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



New Sports Clothes? 




BOSTON 




i -l ^ w ws»t»*wv» w * wl »Hw > t ,ii'v ( , t >t v»>» i ft *"" vv " w , vm*wv ' v*j »»w 



will hold an 



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at 



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Wednesday, February 15th 
Thursday, February 16th 
Friday, February 17 th 

Brush mohair coat sweaters, $ 10 Tweed knickers, $5.75 

Ribbon-bound "scratch' ' felt hats, $2.95 Tweed top-coats, $29.50 

and many other new fashions at low prices 
Just three days — Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, — Wellesley Inn 



FEEE PRESS 



WHEN CHAPEL AND CLASSES 
CLASH 



(Continued from Page 4, Col. 3) 



unrelated experience, or should it ba 
an integral part of one's everyday 
thinking? Chapel services avail little 
if they represent an experience which 
can not be harmonized with any other. 
Since the world at large is far from 
omitting dogmatic material from the 
church services, it seems only plaus- 
ible that a college, whose Bible de- 
partment aims to enlighten, should 
put the results of this enlightenment 
in practical form, and show that 
Christianity has gained rather than 
lost through such a change. Those 
who are so apt to disapprove of a 
critical study of the Bible can be sat- 
isfactorily answered, if it is shown 
concretely that the Church has gained 
in appreciation and ethical training 
by such a study. If the Bible Depart- 
ment cooperated with chapel services, 
there would be in their united efforts 
a force infinitely more effective than 
either could have working counter to 
the other. 1923. 



MODIFIED LECTURES AND 

JUGGLING: A PLEA 



To the Wellesley College News: 

By now many of us have taken one 
or more examinations. Some of them 
were in courses which make use of 
the undiluted lecture system ; others 
were in courses which adopt a modified 
version of it; and none, I dare say, 
were in courses which dispense with 
it altogether. The reason for this lat- 
ter fact is, no doubt, that in every 
course there must be a certain amount 
of knowledge common to the class, on 
which to build a superstructure of ad- 
ditional information. In the modified 
system, the additional facts are ex- 
tracted from the class in recitation, or 
they are assigned for outside required 
preparation. The latter method does 
not involve as much independent 
thinking as the class-room extrac- 
tions, but more facts can be acquired 
thus in a given period of time. 

But as one sits in an examination 
room and stares numbly at questions 
which are designed with the intent to 
test not only one's knowledge but 
one's power to infer meanings and ap- 
plications, and to organize them into 
a whole which shall bear directly on 
the subject of the question — as one 
sits thus, confronted for the first time 
with the need of really taking to heart 
the aspects of the course, one feels 
peculiarly at sea. It is as though an 
acquaintance very casually known 
should suddenly demand to become 
one's best friend. Unless one has 
thought about her with interest be- 
fore, and pondered on her various 
traits, one cannot suddenly take her 
to one's bosom and impart to her the 
ripest fruit of long meditatings by 
night and day. 

And so it is with even the modified 
lecture courses in which class-room 
discussion is avowedly introduced to 
make the student think. In truth, the 
discussion does make her think; but 
what she thinks is usually, " H'm . . . 



WORLD NEWS 



Naval Treaty 

Feb. 1. Five great powers approve 
treaty to limit navies, which ends war 
on the seas forever. 

Opposition to Darwin 

Feb. 2. The Kentucky State Senate 
discusses a bill presented from the 
rural districts, opposing the teaching 
of Darwin's theory of evolution in the 
state schools, on the ground that it is 
contrary to the Bible. 

Strike in Germany 

Feb. 3. The strike of 200,000 rail- 
road employees in Germany threatens 
to develop into a nation-wide general 
strike of all organized labor in resist- 
ance to the government's order deny- 
ing the right of civil service workers 
to leave their jobs. 

Work of Conference Ends 

Feb. 4. All the remaining treaties 
agreed upon in closed committee 
meetings of the delegates at the 
Washington Conference have been 
publicly approved, ending the work of 
the Conference. 

Feb. 4. Extensive ruins of a Roman 
city have been discovered at Santi- 
banez in Spain. Traces have been 
found of a highway and cisterns, and 
numerous remains unearthed in the 
form of gold coins, fragments of ce- 
ramics, and vases filled with ashes. 

Feb. 5. The first case in which a 
transference of human glands has been 
made to cure epilepsy occurred when 
a Sing Sing prisoner had a set of 
these vitally important organs, taken 
from a convict recently executed, im- 
planted in his body. 

Feb. 6. Cardinal Achille Ratti, for- 
merly Archbishop of Milan, becomes 
Pope Pius XL His coronation will 
take place February 12. 

President Harding closes Washing- 
ton Conference, expressing the hope 
, hat future conferences of a like na- 
ture may be held to decide interna- 
tional questions. 



Am I sure that my answer is what she 
wants? Yes, I guess it is . . . Guess 
I'll raise my hand and show I know 
it." Of course there has been some 
cogitation while she figures out what 
the facts happen to be and what rela- 
tion they bear to one another, but she 
is like a juggler who leans back and 
watches his own dexterious hands as 
they juggle red balls. Red balls in 
themselves do not interest him. If we 
compare red balls to the facts found 
in any course we might be led into the 
statement so often made, that one will 
forget the facts but the dexterity will 
remain. Half true. But going farther 
with the analogy, the whole truth is 
that jugglers, though dexterous, know 
really nothing about the manufacture 
or real nature of red balls, even 
though they depend more or less upon 
(Continued on Page 7, Column 2) 



DR. C. E. TAYLOR 
DR. D. R. CLEMENT 

DENTISTS 

WABAN BLOCK, WELLESLEY 
TEL. 1 38- J 



r 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 




MOIHI IM> LECTURES 



(Continued from Page 6) 



Tell Lovers Story 
All Over Again 

Valentine's Day, February 14 

THE sweeter memories of 
events in life are often 
clustered about little gifts of 
sentiment. 

Be it your first or fifteenth 
Valentine you can tell the 
story in no better way than by 
"Saying It with Flowers." 

Simply phone 




THE FLORIST 
Wellesley 597 



I hem [or their livelihood. And should 
one (omo apart, mere dexterity would 
not avail to put it together again. 

And so our plea is this: 

In modified lecture courses, let us 
not allow ourselves to be deceived into 
supposing that we are really making 
a subject part of our lives if we mere- 
ly juggle with its facts in class-room 
discussions. Straight lectures with 
outside papers would do more for us 
than that. If we must juggle, can't we 
think about the red balls just a little, 
on their own account? Which is to 
say, to our instructors, please make 
us worry the facts into our minds and 
hearts during the silent watches of the 
night, with solitary wrestling and medi- 
tation, and we will give you in the ex- 
amination paper part of our real, indi- 
vidual conclusions on the subject, in- 
stead of the conclusions that the class 
as a whole has come to. Perhaps our 
own conclusions will be less valuable 
to you, oh instructors, but they will 
mean more to us. 

1922. 



MISS FRAMES L. WARNER 
ANNOUNCES ENAGEMENT 



Former Member of Wellesley Faculty 
to Marry in June 



Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Morris Warner 
of Putnam, Connecticut, have an- 
nounced the engagement of their 
daughter, Frances Lester Warner, to 
Mr. Mayo Dyer Hersey of Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. 

Mr. Hersey is at present Associate 
Professor in the Department of 
Physics at the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. He organized the 



Aeronautic Instruments Seel ion of the 
Bureau of Standards at Washington 
in 1917, and during the War was sent 
on a special mission to England, 
France, and Italy. 

The wedding will take place at Miss 
Warner's home in June. 

Miss Warner was Assistant Profes- 
sor of English Composition at Wel- 
lesley in 1920-21, but obtained a leave 
of absence for the present academic 
year to become a member of the A t- 
hiu tii- Monthly Editorial Staff. A few 
years ago, Miss Warner began her 
relations with the Atlantic Monthly 
through the Contributors' Column. 
Since that time, she has been the reg- 
ular contributor of a delightful series 
of informal essays. Very recently a 
number of these have been published, 
together with some written by her sis- 
ter in a book entitled Life's Minor 
Collisions. Miss Warner is also the 
author of Endicott and I. 



GRADUATES FIND JOBS ELUSIVE 



(Continued from Page 5) 




for such experienced persons as Y. W. 
C. A. Employment Secretaries, college 
graduates themselves, advising a col- 
lege girl not to try to use her degree 
as an open sesame for a position in the 
business world. 

But 1922 "business-ward" inclined 
need not despair. Once having ob- 
tained a position, however humble or 
inferior, in a reliable company, the col- 
lege girl can easily prove the value of 
her education and thru practical ex- 
perience rise to a more superior posi- 
tion in comparatively short time. Even 
I have advanced in three months from 
"doing files" to the position of super- 
visor in statistical work. Marion Stur- 
gess the author of the much discussed 
article began as a proof-reader in a 
publishing house and is now associate 
editor of a well known magazine. 

Our college education thus is a 
means to promotion once a start is 
made. If the first position is insignifi- 
cant and the salary small, business 
training and the congenial surround- 
ings of an efficient office are compensa- 
tions not to be undervalued. 

Will you forgive the length of this 
discourse? It is merely an attempt to 
explain the position of a college girl 
in business and to urge members of 
1922 to join our ranks. 
Sincerely 
Madeline (Pat) Cassidy. 



The Theatre 



Colonial— Fred Stone in "Tip Top." 
Hollis— William Gillette in "The 

Dream Maker." 
Plymouth — George Arliss in "The 

Green Goddess." 
Selwyn — Helen MacKellar in "Back 

Pay." 
Shubert — Mclntyre and Heath in "Red 

Pepper." 
Wilbur — Joseph Schildkraut and Eva 

Le Galliennc in "Liliom." , 




"The letter says that 
you have been in the em- 
ploy of refined people." 

"Surely my former mis- 
tress did not write that." 

"No, Marie, but that is 
what the letter says. 
Writing paper tells much 
more than many people 
think." 



IOTLAMP 

LRMgM 



Indicates an appreciation 
of the niceties of social 
correspondence. In 
texture, sizes and envelope 
shapes it conforms to the 
standard set by social 
usage. It's a paper of 
quality, yet inexpensive. 

AT ALL GOOD STATIONERS 

Eaton Crane and Pike Co. 

NEW YORK 
PITTSFIELD, MASS. 



CHARACTER ANALYSIS 

FROM HANDWRITING 

Send 10-Line Sample 
Price 50 Cents Stamps Not Accepted 

R. M. BROWN 

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College Girl 
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THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



CALENDAR 



Saturday, February 11 

Junior Promenade. (Mary Hemen- 
way Hall.) 

Sunday, February 12 
11:00 A. M. Houghton Memorial 
Chapel. Preacher, Dr. Percy G. Kam- 
merer of Boston. 

7:30 P. M. Vesper Service. Special 
Music. 

Monday, February 13 

Second Semester Begins. 

5:00 P. M. Houghton Memorial 
Chapel. Dr. James E. Freeman of 
the Church of the Epiphany, Wash- 
ington, D. C, begins a series of ad- 
dresses for the Week of Prayer, clos- 
ing Friday, the 17th. Subject for the 
week, "A Religion of Experience." 
Subject for the day, "The Way of Ex- 
perience." 

Tuesday, February 11 

4:40 P. M. Reading by Professor 
Katharine L. Bates. Room 124, 
Founders' Hall. 

5:00 P. M. Houghton Memorial 
Chapel. Second Week of Prayer ad- 
dress by Dr. Freeman. Subject, "The 
Confusions of Experience." 

Wednesday, February 15 

5:00 P. M. Houghton Memorial 
Chapel. Third Week of Prayer ad- 
dress by Dr. Freeman. Subject, "Ex- 
perience and the Commonplace." 

No meeting of the Christian Asso- 
ciation on campus. Mrs. Alice Ames 
Winter, Wellesley, '86, one of the four 
women delegates to the Washington 
Conference, will speak at Tower Court 
on the work of the Conference. 
Thursday, February 1<> 

7:30 P. M. Zeta Alpha. Meeting of 
the Unitarian Club. Speaker, Dr. 
Samuel McCord Crothers. 



Alumnae Notes 

Alumnae and former students are 
urged to co-operate in making this 
department interesting, I y sending all 
notices promptly to Alumnae Office, 
Wellesley (College) Mass. 



ENGAGED 



'17 Helen M. Nutter to Lewis Oliver 
Hartman of Boston, Editor of Zion's 
Herald. 

BORN 



'11 To Hazel Cowan Bruce, a son, 
George Cowan, November 20, 1921. 

'12 To Mildred Fenner Douglass, a 
son and third child, Fenner Douglass, 
October 28, 1921. 

'16 To Helen Sampson Moore, a 
son, Theodore John, Jr., September 30, 
1921. 

Ex-'IO To Alice Woodward Tub- 
man, a daughter, Barbara, December 
19, at Forest Hills, Mass. 

'17 To Mildred Conrad Comegys, a 
son, Cornelius Breck, Jr., January 10, 
at Scranton, Pa. 



CORRECTION 



The new vice president of the Ath- 
letic Association does not, as an- 
nounced in last week's issue of the 
NEWS, take the place of Ida Webber. 
The election was- of a first vice-presi- 
dent; Ida Webber is second vice- 
president. 



THE 

WELLESLEY NATIONAL BANK 



WELLESLEY, MASS. 

The faculty and students of Wellesley College are 
invited to avail themselves of the privileges and services 
offered by this Bank, and the officers and employees are 
ever ready to render any assistance possible in connection 
with banking matters. 

C. N. TAYLOR, President BENJ. H. SANBORN, Vice-President 
LOUIS HARVEY, Cashier 



Savings Department 



Safe Deposit Boxes 



At The Green Bough Tea House 

February 13 and 14, in the Afternoon 

A SPECIAL DISPLAY OF POPULAR PRICED DRESSES 
IN SPORT STYLE, TAFFETAS FOR AFTERNOON WEAR 
AND SEMI DRESS OCCASIONS. Shown by Mrs. Patch. 
Dresses for the Junior Prom shown at the office, 

453 Washington St., Room 915, Boston, Mass. 



LLOYD'S 

Eyeglasses and Spectacles 
Kodaks and Films 

Student's Fountain Pens and Eversbarp Pencils 

ANDREW J. LLOYD CO. 

315 Washington St. 310 Boylston St. 

75 Summer St. 165 Tremont St. 

BOSTON 

other stores 
CAMBRIDGE- SALEM -BROCKTON 



WANTED 



YOUNG LADIES (pari time) 
EARN $20.00 WEEKY SELLING 
"VERI-BEST" HAIR NETS 
Extra Large, Guaranteed, at Wholesale Prices 
SERVICE SALES COMPANY 

48 E. 25 STREET, NEW YORK CITY 




St Valentines Day, Feb. 14 



TODAY PERPETUATES THIS 
OLD-TIME CUSTOM AND- 

SA Y IT WITH FLOWERS 

CORSAGES 

ROSES VIOLETS 

CARNATIONS SWEET PEAS 

GIFT - BOXES 

Valentine Flowergrams to any part of the 
world in a few hours 

Anderson Conservatories 



5 MINUTES FROM WELLESLEY COLLEGE 




STOP IN ON YOUR WAY 
TO THE "VILL" 
TRY OUR MENU 

CORNER CUPBOARD TEA ROOM 



*(><C>fl(Kir>0()<Cr>«()<Z><)()<=><)()<=>0(? 

H. L. FLAGG CO. 

g Waterman, Moore's and ■? 

(] Conklin Fountain Pens I) 

2 Eversharp Pencils ? 

() Brunswick Records and U 

s Needles if 

() Eaton, Crane & Pike Co.'s I) 

5f Fine Stationery if 

K Wright & Ditson's Athletic 

y Goods X 

K Magazines Newspapers/) 

X Developing and Printing & 

A Films, Die Stamping A 

X Card Engraving * 

A Christmas Cards A 

y Laundry Cases * 

jj WELLESLEY SQUARE J] 

J? Phone 51330 "K 



Frank Brothers 

Fifth Avenue Boot Shop 
near 4P.(th Tf.trcctt, New York 

Master-made Footwear 




Exhibit Shop 
Little Building, Boston 



REAGAN KIPP CO. 

Jewelers and Silversmiths 

162 TREMONT STREET, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



SPECIAL ATTENTION 
GIVEN REPAIR WORK 



BAKER'S 

Sweet Chocolate 




Delicious 
Flavor 

Absolute 
Purity 

High 
Quality 



Sweet Chocolate is very sustaining, 
as it contains more nourishment 
than the same amount of beef. 

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 

Established 1780 DORCHESTER, MASS.